Socializing puppies

Photo courtesy of Metro Creative

Introducing a new dog to the family can bring plenty of excitement, sweet snuggles and puppy kisses.

However, there are also plenty of practical steps to consider to successfully transition a pup into its new environment. Whether you’re a seasoned pet owner or a first-time puppy parent, these tips can help your newest family member feel right at home:

Purchase the necessities ahead of time.

Similar to newborns, new pets require products that fit their size, age and life stage to ensure their safety and good health. This includes chew-proof food and water bowls, an identification tag with name and contact information and a sturdy leash for both walks and training. Many experts discourage retractable leashes because they offer little control. For puppies specifically, some veterinarians recommend harnesses to attach a leash to because their necks are too fragile to attach a leash to a collar.

Remember, puppies are going to grow, and items like beds, crates and collars will need to grow as they do, so you may want to hold off on investing in pricier options until they’ve matured.

Have enough playthings around the house.

Keep dogs from destroying furniture, shoes and household items by providing them with fun, safe and entertaining toys. Chew toys and puzzles that combine play and treats are interactive, which can give dogs mental stimulation and help keep them out of mischief.

Pet-proof the house.

Dogs are naturally curious and spend time exploring their homes, especially pets eager to get to know their new environment. Items on counters and shelves that could be dangerous to a small child are also dangerous for dogs, including wires, sharp or small objects and fragile items. Store them up and away from your dog or in locked cabinets for safekeeping.

Provide a safe spot to retreat.

Moving in to a new home can cause a pet to feel a little disoriented and overwhelmed. Providing a safe place for the dog to retreat from enthusiastic kids, other pets and general household commotion can help the pup feel calmer. A crate or kennel lined with a soft pad or blanket in a quiet area of your home is typically a good choice - it’s a confined space and can also serve a dual-purpose with housetraining, if needed.

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