Shavuot

At a unique crossroads between religion and cuisine, the Jewish holiday of Shavuot celebrates the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai over 3,300 years ago. Shavuot literally means “weeks” and marks the completion of the seven-week period between Passover and Shavuot. The holiday is observed for two days, and this year is celebrated on Sunday, June 9 and Monday, June 10, following the holy day of Shabbat.

As the Torah was given and the laws of kosher dining were first received, the Jewish people were not yet capable of properly preparing beef and poultry and, as such, ate dairy. The rest is history.

Exquisite cheesecakes, ravioli, lasagna, Greek salad and, of course, cheese blintzes all take center stage during this ancient celebration. Some suggest that this has contributed to the renewed popularity the holiday has seen.

When thinking of Jewish holidays, Passover, Chanukah and Yom Kippur come to mind. Nevertheless, Shavuot is considered one of Judaism’s major holidays. In fact, at one point it involved a pilgrimage, during which all of Israel would travel to Jerusalem to celebrate in the temple.

“No, it isn’t all about the food,” said Rabbi Peretz Goldshmid of the Chabad Jewish Center. “What is important is that the community is joining together, hearing the Ten Commandments and celebrating the Torah. But the good food certainly helps!”

The Chabad of the Delta welcomes the community to it’s annual ice cream party and dairy buffet on Sunday, June 9, at 11 a.m.

The Shavuot celebration is free of charge and all are welcome to join, regardless of Jewish affiliation or background. Special program and prizes for all children. RSVP appreciated at JewishDelta.com/Shavuot, or call 925-420-4999.

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