Christina Dalton

Photo courtesy of Christina Dalton

On a recent bike ride, I was refreshed to notice the cut grass and the basketball hoop nets dangling freely in the breeze — no longer wrapped in garbage bags to restrict their use. Still, there are remnants of the coronavirus war. The water fountains are still wrapped in armor. Those walking or jogging on the trail scrutinize me with caution, their face masks worn and ready to battle any germ that may fly their way. These are the markers of resignation and the realities of a new era. This has been a test of our resilience and our character. Who are we really in times of change?

Over the last six weeks, I have been reading Facebook posts. Many have come together with a new perspective and respect toward educators and the understanding of medical people as heroes in our day. There seems to be a new understanding of simpler times when we were not as rushed and self-absorbed, where time for family came first in our value system. But the question remains: Who will we be, and what have we realized about ourselves to move forward in a new understanding of our world?  

Dr. Tasha Eurich, an organizational psychologist, recognizes that before the pandemic, self-awareness was already a foundation for success and happiness. But in this new era, to understand ourselves clearly and compassionately, it is vital to survive the lockdown and build a better life when the lockdown ends.  

Many of us remember vividly where we were when 9/11 ripped through our nation and changed flying forever. Others have stories of their experiences during the Loma Prieta Earthquake. And there are others who experienced the new realities of the 1960s through the eyes of the Vietnam War and three assassinations: President John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. Like COVID-19, each tragedy is a reminder of how vulnerable we are and also how resilient we can become. What will be your legacy moving forward? How do you want to remember yourself and how will you demonstrate a clearer understanding of compassion in this new era? What will your story be?   

– Christina Dalton, Life Coach

Christina Dalton has recently retired from being the Lead Counselor at Heritage High School. Previously, she served as the math department chair at Liberty High School and was a member of  the lead team to open Deer Valley High. Prior to her educational career, she was a marriage and family counselor. She brings these opportunities into empowering her clients through life coaching.  She is the owner of Expanding Your Horizons - (Coaching for Life).  She may be reached at:  calberkgirl65@yahoo.com.

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