Editor: During a recent trip to the Oakley post office, I came across a big handsome husky dog running loose near Main Street. Fearing for his safety, I pulled over and opened the back door of my car. Without hesitation, he jumped right in and made himself at home. He didn’t have a collar or tags to identify him. As a long-time animal advocate, I knew local veterinarians are willing to check for microchips at no cost, so after a quick online search that told me Oakley Veterinary Medical Center was close, I turned the car around and off we went. He had a microchip and his name was Apache. My email message to his owners came back as undeliverable, but I was able to leave a voicemail at the phone number on his microchip. I also uploaded Apache’s photo and details on several local social media platforms including Nextdoor, Doggy911 East County and Oakley Around the Block in an effort to connect with his family.  

Apache’s family lives in San Leandro, and he had been missing since April 2019. From the photos sent to me after I asked for proof of ownership before releasing Apache, I could tell he was a much-loved pet. What I know for sure is that someone had been taking care of Apache for some time, and he could have been reunited with his sad family much sooner. It is my belief that living in a community means we look out for each other, because we never know when you may need help from a stranger. If you find a pet, there are many resources out there to help you reunite it with its owners or at least keep it safe until someone else can help.  As tempting as it may be to keep a friendly and cute animal you find, the reality is these little lost beings are more often than not someone’s beloved pet and family member. They need to get home safely as soon as possible.

Angela Lowrey 

Oakley

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