Editor: As “Hamilton” the musical once said, “History has its eyes on you.”

What happens when a whole group is marginalized to think history does not care about them?

When teaching history, women are often acknowledged, but only as an add-on and are left as noncontributors to historical values. The Smithsonian Magazine found that of 737 historical figures mentioned by name in American historical curriculum, only 178 were women, and two of those were fictional characters. Women have played an active role in history but are not often discussed.

History class teaches about individual men and male groups that have been influential in society, as well as in major events, but students are in the dark when it comes to women who have been just as, if not more, influential.

Some may say that teaching a new curriculum with more information will hinder students’ ability to learn. However, simply editing the requirements to teach an equal number of male and female historical figures allows for the gaps of history to be filled in, and teaches young girls that they can have just as big of an impact on history as boys can. Teaching these various roles women have played, from mother to worker and from activist to soldier, young girls can also realize that they can be anything they set their minds to.

The extensive roles women have played are hardly acknowledged in history. The American education system can change the way they teach in order to expand one’s historical lens.

Kaity Walters

Brentwood

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