Editor: Regarding the 20’x 57’ modernistic stainless steel sculpture by artist Seth Palmiter, I read that some people do not like the artwork and others take issue with the location at Balfour and Route 4.

Some think art should say something or represent Brentwood. Yes, art is in the eye of the beholder, but why would anyone want to demand a limit to what other people behold? The dissenters are a tiny bit of our hundreds of citizens.

I live in the Summerset senior community near Balfour and the golf course. To me, the proposed site is ideal. 

The language of art is an independent expression of the mind. Art is in the heart and soul of our culture. It is the process or product of deliberately arranging elements in a way that appeals to the senses or emotions. It encompasses a diverse range of human activities, creations and ways of expression, including music, literature, film, sculpture and paintings.

Brentwood is a robust community of historic places in the visual, performing and literary arts, all of which qualifies as public art. The City of Brentwood limits public arts to that of sculpture. 

The fine arts have been an essential part of my life. I have been an active performing, visual and literary artist. Art influences society by changing opinions, instilling values and translating experiences across space and time. Research has shown art affects the fundamental sense of self. Art also has utilitarian influences on society.

The Palmiter sculpture is an example of modern art. It is reminiscent of Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore, Marcel Duchamp, Alexander Calder and so many others.

I sense there is a small cadre of people that do not want Brentwood to be the great 21st century place it is — they just want to stay in the past of the Brentwood of the 1940.

Jack Gaughan

Brentwood

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